Jolicloud Me: On cloud mine

I'm not sure exactly when it happened, but at some point in the not-so-long ago past we all stopped talking about hard drives and storage space and started talking about clouds. But not just any cloud. THE cloud. And now people are putting there whole lives up in there; their holiday photos, work documents, their music collections. All safely tucked away in the cloud.

I've not yet succumbed to cloud computing in earnest, but I just got an early invite to an interesting little tool from the French makers of the cloud computing service Jolicloud called Jolicloud Me (read more here, at The Next Web). It even sounds French doesn't it? "All my Edith Piaf rec-ORDs are now in ZI cloud".

In simple terms, Jolicloud Me is a portal that aggregates and helps you track the huge piles of content and information you have stored variously around the web; on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Flickr and elsewhere.

The tool lets you organize your content in three main ways;
  • Through the Cloud Library; organizes your content by media type, time or location. 
  • Through Collections you're able to create around topics (think Pinterest) and
  • Through the "Personal Search" Engine. 
The third, personal search is like Google for you and is a very handy feature. In much the same way as Facebook Timelines, Jolicloud Me also lets you filter your search by year - I appear on the scene around 2007. The timeline feature also works for search. So, for example, you could refine your search to New York > 2011 and see what media is returned.

And the tool is not just a dashboard for organizing your media - each photo, document, link or video can be shared again via your social channels. There's also a Google map for media you geo-located and an icon to let you know where you first shared it (Instagram, for example).

Jolicloud Me is still in the Beta phase and is available for web, iPad, iphone and Android.

As a tool for aggregating and searching media you probably forgot you even had out there on the web, I think it's clever. And no doubt we'll see more tools like it.

What do you think? Share your thoughts and ideas below.